NASA Contributing to Valuable Atmospheric Data

Posted By jngraves on 13 Jan 2015 – 12:12pm in Biological Sciences, Public Health, Physical Sciences, Climate Change, Energy/Engineering, Geology, Social Sciences

NASA has bestowed two Earth science instruments for NOAA’s space weather observing satellite called the Deep Space Climate Observatory (or DSCOVR), set to launch in January 2015. One of the instruments called EPIC (Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera) has a 30 centimeter telescope that measures in the ultraviolet and visible areas of the spectrum, and will image the Earth in one picture providing valuable atmospheric data.

Currently, to get an entire Earth view, scientists have to piece together images from multiple satellites in orbit. “Unlike personal cameras, EPIC will take images in 10 very narrow wavelength ranges,” said Adam Szabo, DSCOVR project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “Combining these different wavelength images allows the determination of physical quantities like ozone, aerosols, dust and volcanic ash, cloud height, or vegetation cover. These results will be distributed as different publicly available data products allowing their combination with results from other missions.”

These data sets are of interest to climate science, hydrology, biogeochemistry, and ecology. The data will also cater insight into Earth’s energy balance.

Category:
Biological Sciences, Public Health, Physical Sciences, Climate Change, Energy/Engineering, Geology, Social Sciences
Tags:
NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland, Atmospheric

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